A nonprofit founded in 1992

Charlotte Observer: Community Foundation gives $375,000 to youth agencies

The Charlotte Mecklenburg Community Foundation recently awarded $375,000 to 17 organizations serving children and youth of Mecklenburg County.

Grants were awarded to fund programs that foster economic opportunity by boosting student achievement and readiness, encouraging positive behaviors during out-of-school time, and promoting wellness, among other focus areas.

The foundation is a permanent endowment at Foundation For The Carolinas that targets programs that afford the county's resident's equal opportunity for a good education, safe housing and better employment. It also works to protect natural resources.

It was launched through a bequest by Lucille Giles in 1995 and has given out more than $30 million in the years sense to nonprofits agencies serving Mecklenburg County residents.

Grant awarded this year include:

  • $25,000 to Ada Jenkins Center for the LEARN Works program for at-risk children. Volunteers and staff foster academic development, promote personal growth, and provide experiences that enrich the educational journey.
  • $20,000 to Arts & Science Council for Studio 345, a free after school youth development program for at-risk high school students that uses an arts-based curriculum proven to increase high school graduation rates.
  • $30,000 to the BELL Foundation for BELL Summer, a five to six week learning experience for youth from under-resourced schools that combines academic instruction with hands-on enrichment activities, field trips, and service projects.
  • $15,000 to Bruce Irons Camp Fund to provide residential summer camp enrichment activities to CMS students who demonstrate strong academic effort, good citizenship, and leadership potential.
  • $35,000 to Charlotte Bilingual Preschool to enable the program to increase the number of preschool children enrolled in its bilingual education program.
  • $10,000 to Charlotte Speech and Hearing to fund the Community Language/Literacy Impact Program (CLIP), which brings together speech-language pathologists and childcare facilities to improve the language skills of low-income/minority children.
  • $20,000 to Children's Home Society of North Carolina for Wise Guys, a male responsibility program that aims to reduce teen pregnancy and dating violence by changing the attitudes, behaviors, and perceptions of masculinity among boys ages 11 to 17.
  • $15,000 to Circle de Luz for College 101, a higher education preparatory program for Latina students that provides guidance during the college application process, conducts workshops addressing obstacles to college opportunities, and provides educational family programming and technology support.
  • $10,000 to Citizen Schools to expand the learning day of urban middle school students by thirty percent, offering weekly apprenticeships with community volunteers, daily academic support, and partnerships with teachers and school leaders to build a common vision for turnaround.
  • $25,000 to Communities in Schools to prepare at-risk high school students for the next phase of educational and economic opportunity, helping them succeed in the classroom, stay on track to graduate, and prepare for post-secondary education and careers.
  • $25,000 to Freedom School Partners to support the 2015 Freedom School Summer Program, which seeks to build the literacy, character skills, and community awareness of 1,200 low-income children for six weeks during the summer.
  • $25,000 to Golden Door Scholars for the Professional Development Program, which aims to ensure that low-income scholars have robust professional opportunities by convening a three-day Professional Development Summit for students and providing stipends to those who accept unpaid internships.
  • $25,000 to HEART Tutoring for the recruitment of volunteers to tutor elementary school students, helping students build foundational math skills and an enthusiasm for academics needed for long-term success.
  • $20,000 to Project Scientist for its STEM Partnership with Oaklawn Language Academy, which will serve underrepresented female populations in STEM with year-round and summer programming for third through fifth grade girls.
  • $30,000 to Renaissance West Community Initiative to fund programs and services for the Initiative, which continues to implement a comprehensive continuum of education and support services for children and families as part of a community revitalization effort in west Charlotte.
  • $30,000 to Urban League of Central Carolinas for the Linking Youth to Technology through Education program, which offers technology training to elementary through high school students in CMS Schools.
  • $15,000 to YWCA Central Carolinas for Reading Basics-Reading Success, which focuses on Kindergarten through second grade students in Mecklenburg YWCA Youth Learning Centers who need to learn the 100 sight words critical to reading on grade level by third grade.

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/incoming/article29525308.html#storylink=cpy